Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby scheckaet » 10:43 am Sep 26 2013

3 WAYS TO TUNE YOUR KIPS: get the kips to activate later / smooth out the powerband or get it to hit harder/sooner

1: Kips ball and spring.

this is the KIPS pre-tension mechanism.
Removing one or even 2 of the copper washer (compressing the spring) (same if you used a stiffer spring) under the 10 mm nut holding spring and ball will activate the KIPS LATER and get a more mellow powerband (good for tight single track or beginners).

Removing spring and ball will let the kips activate much EARLIER, harder hit.

It s easy enough you can even try on the trail! (And lose said spring and ball in the dirt :roll: :mrgreen: )
I stuff grease in there myself to keep everything operating smooth and together when I take it apart.

2: KIPS cover spacer
thanks to Brock@BDK

viewtopic.php?f=77&t=12800

yes a spacer plate on the KIPS expansion bottle should make a performance improvement to the water cooled as well as the air-cooled models.

Essentially the resonator bottle or expansion bottle is lengthening the exhaust pipe when open, so that you now have two different length pipes depending on revs.

Exhaust pipes are designed to only one rev range (for example 7000rpm) where they will perform best and everywhere else is a compromise. The longer the pipe the lower in the rev range it is tuned to. Typically road pipes are tuned to perform best well below the red line where the manufacturer deems most riders will be cruising (and to discourage you from holding it next to the redline where longevity is compromised). Performance pipes are typically shorter and work best closer to the redline (more rpm, more bhp).

Having an expansion bottle allows you to have two rpm's where the pipe is close to ideal, giving you a boost in mid-range performance.

In fact for whatever reason on a few models (the KDX and KMX notably) the bottle was not quite big enough to produce best spread of power and this becomes more pronounced with a shorter performance pipe. Quite why they did this is anyone's guess, but reducing the visual 'barnacle' effect may have had an influence.

The above is not a thorough technical rendition, there is a lot going on there but it gives those that don't know a good grip on the situation. As mentioned by someone else before on a previous thread; once the KIPS resonator is closed you are back to normal so there is no compromise of top end power for this low to mid 'boost'.

In bhp terms the improvement will not be astounding (at low revs the engine isn't making much power anyway), but in terms of percentage it is significant for the cost and ease of fit and makes the bike more forgiving and flexible.

adjust the resonator chamber volume by adding a spacer (not sure who makes them but they are out there) this should give you more low end torque but lower maximum RPM.
(the resonator cover is on the left hand side of the bike, just behind the slotted cap we mentioned before)

I can recall 2 different threads about making a spacer ranging from 250 thousands of an inch (or 6.35 mm) to 10 mm.
Another member (frenche200) mentioned using a spare kips cover, cut the top and get a spacer to the desired thickness for cheap ;)

3: change springs in the kips

viewtopic.php?f=77&t=12425
moose racing makes a KIPS tuning kit that basically just consists of 2 different KIPS springs one softer for a quicker, harder hitting opening of the valves and one stiffer for a later, smoother opening of the valves
02 KX 200 hybrid: RB head and carb :prayer:
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jetting guide: viewtopic.php?f=105&t=1156
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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby scheckaet » 11:06 am Oct 07 2013

LEAKY SEAL

Want to get a few more rides before replacing the seal or too broke to replace them?

There you go!
http://www.sealmate.net/
or better yet make your own from scratch:
http://kdxrider.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=77&t=14728

thanks to Thrahl.
Another trick: pour transmission stop leak (or WD40) around the seal and let it sit for a few minutes (overnight) pumping the forks occasionally.
It causes the seals to swell a little and hopefully brings some life in to old, dry seals.
02 KX 200 hybrid: RB head and carb :prayer:
DRZ 400 SM :supz:

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newb info: viewtopic.php?f=77&t=12457#p117919
jetting guide: viewtopic.php?f=105&t=1156
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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby scheckaet » 01:00 pm Oct 07 2013

The Great Oil Debate
by Chokey
http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/720396 ... il-change/

There's a lot of myths about oils that are or not suitable for our machines, and most of them have absolutely no factual basis.

"Don't use an energy Conserving oil or your clutch will slip."

"You must use a JASO MA rated oil in your engine or you'll cause premature failure and wear."

The myth about automotive oils making your clutch slip started when the Energy Conserving (EC) standard came into being. EC oils have much lower levels of zinc and phosphorous, because these additives can damage a catalytic converter. And the word moly automatically makes people think that the moly additive will cause buildup on the plates which will lead to slippage. But the truth is there is nothing wrong with oils that contain moly, and in fact many motorcycle-specific oils contain moly. I have yet to see any evidence to show that any so-called "friction-modified" (Energy Conserving, or EC) oil will cause any problems. In fact, all engine oils have friction modifiers of some sort in them. The Energy Conserving designation (EC) was devised to denote oils that met new emissions standards requiring lower levels of phosphorous. The EC standard is about emissions, not friction.

Since the standard requires a reduction in useful additives such as phosphorous and zinc, the manufacturers had to come up with replacements. One of the additives that the oil engineers can use to bring the lubrication properties back to the level that it was with the higher levels of phosphorus is molybdenum (moly).


The problem with the belief that the moly additive will make clutches slip is that oil companies don't use the form of moly that would cause this problem, Molybdenum Disulfide MoS2. That type of moly is typically used for the formulation of industrial gear lubes, chain lubes, and greases, not engine or transmission oils.

Engine oil formulators use Molybdenum DialkyldiThioCarbamate. This formulation of moly has been proven in both lab testing and actual use to not cause clutch problems at any level you are ever going to find in an oil bottle.

The funny thing is, many people will start beating the "moto-specific-oil" drum, and try to tell you that if you don't use motorcycle oil, your clutch will slip. But in fact, many JASO MA rated (certified for use in a wet-clutch environment) moto-specific oils contain levels of moly that are much higher than any EC-rated automotive oil. So if it's bad in an automotive oil, why then is it perfectly acceptable in a motorcycle oil?

Even the JASO MA rating is itself a scam in my opinion. All it means is that an oil has been submitted for certification as to it's ability to operate in a wet clutch environment. That does not, however, mean that a non- JASO MA oil will not perform equally well in the same wet-clutch environment. Many oils are simply not submitted for this certification, beca7use the manufacturers are not specifically targeting the motorcycle market, so they do not wish to invest the time and money required to obtain that certification. And in fact, there are more than a few motorcycle specific oils on the market that do not have the JASO MA certification.

Most any oil will be acceptable in your tranny, as long as it is changed at reasonable intervals. The problem is, what would be considered a reasonable interval for any other engine is not a reasonable interval for our bikes. The real enemy of oil in our trannies is in contamination from the clutch, and viscosity-shear from the gear teeth. The only solution for those problems is frequent oil changes. In most cases, choosing an oil that your budget allows you to change frequently is better than choosing a much more expensive oil that you aren't willing to change as often because of the high cost.

So called "diesel" oils are nothing more than automotive oils with a more robust additive package, especially higher detergent levels. Some of the best performing oils that you can find for our trannies are diesel oils such as Delo and Rotella T. And some of those high-dollar "boutique" moto-specific oils will shear out of viscosity faster than a standard off-the-shelf auto oil. Most oils will shear out of viscosity in our transmissions, under race conditions, in as little as 4 hours. If that doesn't convince you of the need for frequent changes, then nothing will.

I Use ATF type F in my two-stroke trannies. It's an excellent choice for a wet clutch environment, it has better thermal stability and shear resistance than most engine oils. It's also very cheap at $1.29 a quart, so I change it after every ride. You can also use gear oil, or any good engine oil. How often you change it is more important than what you put in it.

I use the ATF in my KX250. For my YZ250F, I use Shell Rotella 10W40. I change it every 3-4 hours.

Of course, there will always be the nay-sayers that will swear that you are leading your machine to an early death if you don't run those so-called "moto-specific" JASO MA oils, or that you are going to do damage to your clutch. And that's just such a crock. There are many motorcycle oils that do not have the JASO MA rating, as well as many automotive oils that meet or exceed the same standards but simply haven't been submitted for certification because they aren't targeted at the motorcycle market. But, since so many dealers (that make a huge profit on oil sales) try to convince riders that they are doing their machines a disservice by not using these products, and the myth is perpetuated on sites such as this, the debate goes on and on...and it will probably never be resolved. But if running that high-dollar moto-specific oil makes you feel better, then by all means, use it, there's something to be said for the feel-good factor, after all.
02 KX 200 hybrid: RB head and carb :prayer:
DRZ 400 SM :supz:

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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby scheckaet » 06:23 pm Dec 11 2013

02 KX 200 hybrid: RB head and carb :prayer:
DRZ 400 SM :supz:

bike build: viewtopic.php?f=111&t=8245&hilit=bike+stable
bike profile viewtopic.php?p=30709#30709

newb info: viewtopic.php?f=77&t=12457#p117919
jetting guide: viewtopic.php?f=105&t=1156
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Re: Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I sta

Postby scheckaet » 11:19 am Feb 26 2014

SPARK PLUG

correct plug is:
NGK BR8ES

viewtopic.php?f=77&t=13480&p=126088&hilit=spark+plug#p126088

correct gap:
02 KX 200 hybrid: RB head and carb :prayer:
DRZ 400 SM :supz:

bike build: viewtopic.php?f=111&t=8245&hilit=bike+stable
bike profile viewtopic.php?p=30709#30709

newb info: viewtopic.php?f=77&t=12457#p117919
jetting guide: viewtopic.php?f=105&t=1156
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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby scheckaet » 11:03 am Mar 02 2014

BLEEDING BRAKES

They can be somewhat difficult to bleed (especially the front) but if you use the right procedure and are patient they will lock the wheel when needed.

viewtopic.php?f=77&t=5855&hilit=mity+vac
02 KX 200 hybrid: RB head and carb :prayer:
DRZ 400 SM :supz:

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bike profile viewtopic.php?p=30709#30709

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jetting guide: viewtopic.php?f=105&t=1156
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Re: Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I sta

Postby scheckaet » 10:23 pm Mar 03 2014

RACING PREP:

Thanks to: gsa102
I added a few comments here and there that I thought would fit well in this section.
y'all feel free to add anything else...
viewtopic.php?f=136&t=15468

-Wear the best safety gear you can afford.
Expect some bruises and monkey-butt...

-Water: Hydration starts the day before the race. Get a good hydration pack with enough water for the race and after...(duh!)
watch out for dehydration, heat exhaustion and worst heat stroke! know the signs! (see next post)

For beginners: Just try to finish the 2 hour race. That is a huge accomplishment. Get there early and ask questions, everybody is friendly. It is a good family environment.
Don't forget to have FUN...

FITNESS:
If you want to run an endurance race, the best investment is in your fitness. You have to pace yourself, but the more fit you are, the faster the pace.
I prefer a bicycle over running, to save the knees, also to develop balance.

Conserve energy any way you can. (that's where a well tuned suspension and properly jetted bike will help the most)
Don't get stuck and don't fall. Easy, right?

TRAINING:
Ride as much as you can with faster riders, to push the pace. Consider an MX track to develop timing and familiarity with the bike.

BIKE PREP:
1 jetting, jetting, jetting. easy and cheap to sort out.
2 suspension:
before you spend any money on engine mod, get the correct spring for your weight!
Get a revalve if you have money left.
you have to be able to put the power down and keep it there to carry momentum.

We all know, upgrade the forks to more capable units. I had the stockers hang in ruts, too. If you are stuck in a rut, put one knee on the seat and try to keep the weight off the front and drive out of it. Worked for me once.

Take the time to dial in the rear suspension. Re-valves and springs are worth the money. Grease the linkage at least 2x a season. Your butt and back will thank you.

Take the time to get the jetting right: Poor Jetting = stalling. Stalling = kicking and not conserving energy.
Fouled plugs = pushing. Pushing sucks, that is why we buy bikes with engines.

Take the sidestand off ! It will hang in ruts and on roots. (+ less weight)

If in doubt, replace it (cables, chain, brake pads, levers).

Get the good, full wrap handguards. The stock ones are inadequate. I have hit trees hard enough to bend the carbon-steel bars, and kept going.

Consider a woods handlebar bend. Or cut stock ones down an inch on each side. It may be a mental thing, but it makes a difference.

New plug for race day. A spare air filter is helpful, so you always have one ready to go.

New tires are always better, but you can get a season out of them.

General racing:
Consider running a 200 cc class, so you are only racing similar displacement bikes. A "bomber" (older bike) class is good, too.

GNCC: Pre-register online, it's WAY faster. And get ready for traffic. In the GNCC I ran two years ago, there were 400 bikes on a 9 mile course in the am race.

Conserve your energy, no need to go all balls out on lap 1 and have 0 energy for the rest of the race.
Look ahead, where you want to go, don't stare at that rock in the middle of the trail...(sounds dumb but it's so true!)

Look for ways around stuck riders. Younger riders are good for going fast then falling and blocking the trail.

Most obstacles reward being aggressive and maintaining momentum. See suspension setup and fitness.

The trail changes constantly, especially through mud-holes. Look for a smoother, easier path. Experience helps a lot here.

Let faster riders by but don't stop to do it if at all possible. Some are rude and some are polite.

The most satisfying races I have had are when I have met up with a rider of similar speed and we "battled." Even when I lost. Or when I found good flow on the track and felt really fast.


Bike Failures I have had:
Fouled plugs - see jetting

Out of gas (not the kdx) - see jetting. The stock kdx tank is good for a two hour plus race.

Front brakes overheated and locked up on the kdx - should have changed the brake pads, and I suspect there was an issue with the master cylinder. Common on old bikes. Rebuilt the cylinder and no problems since.

Broken brake lever - see get good handguards.

Common Failures I have seen:
Bent/stripped shifter

Flat tires - you should have run a little more air pressure!

Stick in the eye - keep those goggles on, I don't care how hot you are!

Stripped out front sprocket. see bike prep
02 KX 200 hybrid: RB head and carb :prayer:
DRZ 400 SM :supz:

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jetting guide: viewtopic.php?f=105&t=1156
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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby scheckaet » 11:43 pm Mar 03 2014

Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke

A little lengthy but informative.

Being exposed to high temperatures for long periods of time or engaging in vigorous activities in high temperatures can lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke, especially if you are dehydrated or are taking certain medications such as antihistamines, blood pressure medication, or antidepressants.

Usually sweat evaporates from the skin to help cool the body. It is harder for sweat to evaporate if:
The humidity is high
You are wearing tight or layered clothing that covers most of your skin
You are dehydrated, which will cause you to produce less sweat

Heat Exhaustion
Heat exhaustion is a less serious condition than heat stroke. Symptoms can include:
Normal or only slightly elevated body temperature
Cool, moist (clammy), pale skin
Sweating (sometimes heavily)
Headache
Nausea/vomiting
Dizziness/weakness/fatigue
Rapid pulse
Decreased blood pressure
Dark urine
Muscle cramps
Rapid/shallow breathing
To respond to heat exhaustion:

Move into the shade or an air conditioned space.
Loosen clothing or remove as much clothing as possible.
Drink cool water or non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated beverages like sports drinks to help restore electrolyte balance.
Take a cool shower or sponge bath.
Spray cool water on yourself and sit in front of a fan or have others fan you.
Massage or stretch cramping muscles.
Monitor your temperature for changes in your condition that suggest heat stroke (see below).
Call the UHS 24-hour Nurse Advice Line at (512) 475-6877 if you have questions.
Seek emergency treatment or call 911 if attempts to decrease body temperature fail or if you experience chest pain, abdominal pain, persistent vomiting so that you can't keep down fluids, or if you develop any of the symptoms of heat stroke (see below).


Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is an emergency situation in which the body loses its ability to cool itself. The internal body temperature rises to extremes, sometimes as high as 106 degrees F. Heat stroke can result in death if not treated promptly. Symptoms include:

Very high body temperature, usually over 104 degrees F
No sweating
Hot, dry, red skin
Rapid pulse
Difficulty breathing
If body temperatures aren't reduced, symptoms can progress to:

Confusion, irritability, disorientation, or hallucinations
Seizures
Loss of consciousness and coma
Death
To respond to heat stroke, CALL 911 or go to the closest emergency room. While waiting for EMS:

Move the person into the shade or into air conditioning.
Elevate their feet higher than their head to reduce the chance of shock.
Remove clothing and attempt to cool them down by wrapping them in a cool, wet sheet or spraying them with cool water and fanning them.
Put ice packs or cold compresses under their arms, on their groin area, and behind their neck.
Give them cool drinks only if tthey are not disoriented and not vomiting.
Stay with them until EMS arrives.
Preventing Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke

Stay hydrated by drinking lots of non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated beverages, even if you're not thirsty. Water is good, but sports drinks are better if you are engaging in vigorous activity in high temperatures.

Drink enough to keep your urine very pale yellow. If it's a dark yellow, or if you are going for long periods of time without urinating, you're dehydrated. (Some medications and supplements can turn urine bright yellow or orange. If in doubt, ask a pharmacist or your healthcare provider about the medications and supplements you use.)
Don't stay outside in high temperatures for long periods of time. Take breaks indoors.
Don't engage in vigorous activity in the hottest part of the day - from 11am - 5pm.
Wear loose, lightweight clothing made of fabric that breathes and allows your sweat to evaporate.
If you start to feel very hot or have any of the symptoms of heat exhaustion, respond immediately as described above under "heat exhaustion."
02 KX 200 hybrid: RB head and carb :prayer:
DRZ 400 SM :supz:

bike build: viewtopic.php?f=111&t=8245&hilit=bike+stable
bike profile viewtopic.php?p=30709#30709

newb info: viewtopic.php?f=77&t=12457#p117919
jetting guide: viewtopic.php?f=105&t=1156
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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby scheckaet » 10:00 am Mar 21 2014

PIPE DENT REMOVAL

Here is a few links that shows good how to:
https://www.youtube.com/v/cSHD9tI2vWM
https://www.youtube.com/v/2XpEhDAmleo
02 KX 200 hybrid: RB head and carb :prayer:
DRZ 400 SM :supz:

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bike profile viewtopic.php?p=30709#30709

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jetting guide: viewtopic.php?f=105&t=1156
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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby scheckaet » 09:49 am Apr 28 2014

CHOKE WON"T STAY UP?

you can either replace it ($$) or zip tie the rubber part (no $$)

viewtopic.php?f=77&t=15765
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DRZ 400 SM :supz:

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jetting guide: viewtopic.php?f=105&t=1156
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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby goodoboy » 09:04 pm May 03 2014

Hello,

Even if I purchased a used bike, do I still need to perform top end. Technically, the title says "got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?". Mine is used. Just asking.

At any rate, I know I will have to perform this work and going to the motorcycle store tommorow, is there anything tools I need to pick up. I own now. lol

Thanks for the help.
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Re: Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I sta

Postby diymirage » 10:31 pm May 03 2014

since you bought a 220 without any proof of a top end job, yes

all you need is basic mechanics tools, 12 mm socket, 10 mm wrench, basic Philips screwdriver, torquewrench and a MANUAL
newbbewb wrote:DIYmirage has it right.


-1996 KDX 200 woods weapon (converted to 99 green body)
-1996 KDX 200 plated street toy (barney edition)
-2003 Yamaha TTR125-L (wifeys bike)
-1997 KDX 220 project bike
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Re: Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I sta

Postby goodoboy » 12:14 am May 04 2014

diymirage wrote:since you bought a 220 without any proof of a top end job, yes

all you need is basic mechanics tools, 12 mm socket, 10 mm wrench, basic Philips screwdriver, torquewrench and a MANUAL


Thanks for responding. Is this all the tools I need and material? I have the manual that come with the bike. Does the manual explain step-by-step instructors?

I am going to a bike store tommorow, can I pick the tools up from there or any hardware store?

THanks. I know the questions are basic, but I am learning. lol lol
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Re: Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I sta

Postby diymirage » 08:05 am May 04 2014

if I remember correctly that is all it takes, well, maybe also an 8 and 10 mm socket to get the exhaust and tank off
if you have a basic set of mechanics tools you should be good

I wouldn't look for them at a bike shop, but rather a home improvement store or even wallmart or autozone

im honoustly not sure if the manual has step by step instructions, ive been riding dirtbikes since I was 15 and have always done most of the work myself so I didn't bother getting a manual :shh:


theres some video in this thread
viewtopic.php?f=77&t=11288&p=107598&hilit=tear+down#p107598

might be helpfull
newbbewb wrote:DIYmirage has it right.


-1996 KDX 200 woods weapon (converted to 99 green body)
-1996 KDX 200 plated street toy (barney edition)
-2003 Yamaha TTR125-L (wifeys bike)
-1997 KDX 220 project bike
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Re: Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I sta

Postby 6 Riders » 06:50 pm May 05 2014

Buy a Craftsmen tool set on sale. You'll need/want a couple torque wrenches, one in inch pounds and one if foot pounds. I also recommend an "impact screw driver" the type you hit with a hammer to break loose tight/stuck screws and bolts....it will save you a ton of headaches in the long run.
newbbewb wrote:^what he said.

masterblaster wrote:Man 6 riders you rock.

*side note...I'm drunk, so try to read what I'm trying to say, instead of what I actually type
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Re: Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I sta

Postby goodoboy » 11:29 pm May 05 2014

Can I someone please give me example of all the tools I will need for maintenance and top end rebuild so I can get ready. Just a picture will be fine, I am not good with wrenching. Probably haven't turned a wrench in about 2 years. But I am willing to take the time to learn.

Thanks
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Re: Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I sta

Postby goodoboy » 11:31 pm May 05 2014

6 Riders wrote:Buy a Craftsmen tool set on sale. You'll need/want a couple torque wrenches, one in inch pounds and one if foot pounds. I also recommend an "impact screw driver" the type you hit with a hammer to break loose tight/stuck screws and bolts....it will save you a ton of headaches in the long run.


Thanks, can you show example please.
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Re: Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I sta

Postby goodoboy » 11:32 pm May 05 2014

diymirage wrote:if I remember correctly that is all it takes, well, maybe also an 8 and 10 mm socket to get the exhaust and tank off
if you have a basic set of mechanics tools you should be good

I wouldn't look for them at a bike shop, but rather a home improvement store or even wallmart or autozone

im honoustly not sure if the manual has step by step instructions, ive been riding dirtbikes since I was 15 and have always done most of the work myself so I didn't bother getting a manual :shh:


theres some video in this thread
viewtopic.php?f=77&t=11288&p=107598&hilit=tear+down#p107598

might be helpfull



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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby scheckaet » 09:36 am May 06 2014

02 KX 200 hybrid: RB head and carb :prayer:
DRZ 400 SM :supz:

bike build: viewtopic.php?f=111&t=8245&hilit=bike+stable
bike profile viewtopic.php?p=30709#30709

newb info: viewtopic.php?f=77&t=12457#p117919
jetting guide: viewtopic.php?f=105&t=1156
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Newb thread: got a new (to you) bike? where should I start?

Postby diymirage » 08:21 pm May 06 2014

scheckaet wrote:complete motor tear down:

viewtopic.php?f=77&t=11288&p=107598&hilit=tear+down#p107598



I guess my link wasn't good enough :naughty:
newbbewb wrote:DIYmirage has it right.


-1996 KDX 200 woods weapon (converted to 99 green body)
-1996 KDX 200 plated street toy (barney edition)
-2003 Yamaha TTR125-L (wifeys bike)
-1997 KDX 220 project bike
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